Participants

Hosam Aboul-ElaGazbiyya Sirry-Abbas Bridge (1946-55)

Robyn Creswell

Sayed Elsisi

Gonzalo Fernández

Sabry Hafez

Richard Jacquemond

Margaret Litvin

Samia Mehrez

Christopher Stone


Hosam Aboul-Ela

Hosam Aboul-Ela is an associate professor, who teaches courses in postcolonial literature, literary theory, and world literature at the University of Houston. His research takes a radically comparative approach, combining exploration of the various fields of globalization theory, postcolonial studies, literature of the Americas, translation studies, and Arab cultural studies. His work examines the point of connection between the literary and the social through the historicization of critical theory. His current projects include a new book examining the link between literary culture and empire in the United States from World War II to the present and a translation of the novel talassus by Egyptian author Sonallah Ibrahim.


Robyn Creswell

Robyn Creswell is an Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Brown.  His research focuses on modernist poetry and poetics in Arabic, French, and English. Other interests include classical Arabic and contemporary American poetry, elegy as a comparative genre, and the theory and practice of translation. He is the translator of Abdelfattah Kilito’s The Clash of Images (New Directions, 2010), and Sonallah Ibrahim’s That Smell and Notes from Prison (New Directions, forthcoming 2013). He is poetry editor of The Paris Review.


Sayed Elsisi

Sayed Elsisi is a professor at the  University of Maryland. Prior to that, he was at Harvard University (2007-2010), where he taught advanced courses: “Arabic Cultural, literary and Political Readings.” He taught before at The American University in Cairo (2000-2007), in the CASA Program, Modern and Classical Arabic Literature courses, in addition to Advanced courses of Arabic MSA and Egyptian Colloquial in Arab Cinema. Dr. Elsisi earned his PhD with the first honor degree for his dissertation “The Arabic Prose Poem: Study in the Poetics of the Genre” at Cairo University, where he also received his BA (1993) and MA (awarded as the best dissertation in Arabic Literature, 2000). Dr. Elsisi is currently working on a project to study The Omitted Genres throughout the history of Arabic criticism – questioning the “Poetics” in classical and modern Arabic literary criticism.


Gonzalo Fernández

Gonzalo Fernández Parrilla is a Spanish academic, translator and researcher. He has been Associate Professor of Arabic Literature at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid since 2006. He was previously Director of the Research Centre Escuela de Traductores de Toledo (Toledo School of Translators, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 2002-2006) and has been Deputy Director since its foundation in 1994. He has also worked as a translator at the United Nations. He is the author of a history of modern Moroccan literature, La literatura marroquí contemporánea, and has edited a number of books includingRemembering for TomorrowOrientalismo, exotismo y traducción and Autobiografía y literatura árabe. He is the director of the Spanish series of Arabic literature Memorias del Mediterráneo, published by Ediciones del Oriente y del Mediterráneo.


Sabry Hafez


Richard Jacquemond

Richard Jacquemond is a French scholar and renowned translator of Arabic literature. He currently works as a Professor of Arabic Literature at the University of Aix-Marseille in France, where he serves as the Director of the Department of Middle East Studies. He has translated into French works by Sonallah Ibrahim, Naguib Mahfouz, Latifa al-Zayyat and many others, and served as the Director of the Translation Department of the French Cultural Mission in Egypt from 1988-1995. He is also the author ofConscience of The Nation: Writers, State and Society in Modern Egypt (2008), which examines the modern history of the Egyptian literary field.


Margaret Litvin

Margaret Litvin is an Assistant Professor of Arabic and Comparative Literature at Boston University. Margaret Litvin writes about modern Arabic drama and political culture. She has written on topics including the many reworkings of Shakespeare’s Hamlet in postcolonial Egypt, Syria, and Iraq and well as the educational and cultural ties between the Soviet Union and several Arab countries during and since the Cold War, tracing their effects on Arabic literature and theatre. She holds a PhD from the University of Chicago’s Committee on Social Thought (2006) and has been an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Yale University’s Whitney Humanities Center. At BU she advises the Arabic minor and teaches courses on Arabic language and literature (both in Arabic and in English translation), as well as seminars on “Global Shakespeares” and on the worldwide appropriation of the 1001 Nights.


Samia Mehrez

Samia Mehrez is a Professor of Arabic Literature at the American University in Cairo. She currently teaches modern Arabic literature, as well as courses on translation studies and theory in the Department of Arab and Islamic Civilizations. She obtained her BA and MA from the American University in Cairo (AUC) and completed her PhD at UCLA, where her dissertation focused on the works of the Egyptian writer Gamal al-Ghitani. Before joining AUC, she taught at Cornell University from 1984-1990 in the Department of Near Eastern Studies. She is the founding director of the newly established AUC Center for Translation Studies. She has published numerous articles in the fields of modern Arabic literature, postcolonial literature, translation studies, gender studies and cultural studies. She is the author of Egyptian Writers between History and Fiction: Essays on Naguib Mahfouz, Sonallah Ibrahim and Gamal al-Ghitani, (1994 and 2005) and Egypt’s Culture Wars: Politics and Practice, (2008 and 2010).


Christopher Stone

Christopher Stone is Associate Professor of Arabic and Head of the Arabic Program at Hunter College of the City University of New York.  He is the author of Popular Culture and Nationalism in Lebanon: Fairouz and the Rahbani Nation. His recent projects include work on Egyptian Cinema and the translation of Palestinian Literature.  He is currently residing in Egypt as an ARCE Fellow where he is starting a research project on Sheikh Imam.  In June of this year he will become the stateside director of the CASA program.


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